Contents

Survivor's Notebook

Survivor’s Notebook: Government Scare Tactics – Human Pappilomavirus (HPV)

Recently there has been serious concern across the country about the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is supposedly a viral STD found in or near the female sex organ. The modern medical system blames HPV as the main cause of cervical cancer. In 2007, it was estimated that 11,000 women in the United States would be diagnosed with this type of cancer and nearly 4,000 would die from it. According to the American Social Health Association, about 20 million Americans are infected with HPV. It is expected that 5.5 million will contract it through sexual contact each year. In fact, it’s so common that it’s estimated that 75 to 90% of adults will become infected some time in their lives. Most of the time, the body will usually cure itself naturally within 2 years. Most people who catch HPV will never know they had it because they rarely show symptoms.

If we do the math, we will see that, according to the above statistics, about 11 of 20,000 (0.055%) American women who get HPV will get cervical cancer and 4 of 20,000 will die from it. Since almost every woman will get HPV, then we can say that about 4 out of every 20,000 (0.02%) American women will die of cervical cancer. The accuracy of these statistics, like all statistics, is questionable, but even so, 4 out of 20,000 is not an alarming rate.

HPV is said to be the cause of cervical cancer, but in traditional healing, we never say that something is the cause of an illness. This is because, by poinging the finger at one factor as being the cause, we are closing our eyes to other factors that may have contributed to the illness. If HPV was really the cause of cervical cancer, then we should expect that a very high rate of people diagnosed with HPV will actually get cervical cancer, probably at least half. Then we could say that it has a lot to do with it, but even then, what about the other half of the women who didn’t get cervical cancer? Even then, we have to say that there must be more to it, what did the 1 half do different from the other half? The HPV only tells part of the story.

Cervical cancer victim Jade Goody of Britain has raised the awareness abouit cervical cancer. HPV is said to be the cause of cervical cancer, but this claim should be questioned.

Cervical cancer victim Jade Goody of Britain has raised the awareness abouit cervical cancer. HPV is said to be the cause of cervical cancer, but this claim should be questioned.

But back to reality, only 11 out of 20,000 women with a history of HPV develop cervical cancer. Considering the fact that virtually every woman will get HPV at some point, saying that HPV causes cervical cancer is like saying the common cold causes lung cancer. Imagine your doctor telling you that you should take a vaccine for the common cold because 11 out of 20,000 people women who catch the common cold will get lung cancer. What if he goes on to say that even if you take the vaccine, that you will probably still get a cold.

This is the situation with HPV. The medical industry has developed a vaccine that supposedly prevents 4 strains of the HPV, but there are over 100 known strains of the virus. So basically, the vaccine is useless. This is added to the fact that the virus itself is really no cause for concern. It’s a virus that everyone will catch and most will easily recover from, with no symptoms. A very small minority will develop cervical cancer and some will die from it. This is what the media is using to scare people.

If we don’t look at HPV as the cause of cervical cancer, we can look at other contributing factors: Multiple sex partners, poor eating habits, weakened immune system, birth control pills, smoking, chemical exposure and excessive
douching. It’s also said that regular pap smears and follow up treatment prevents almost 100% of cervical cancer cases. Given the fact that the vaccine does almost nothing to stop women from catching HPV, we should ask ourselves 2 questions: Why are we being bombarded with information about HPV, and why are companies aggressively marketing a vaccine for it?

Even though we’re just now hearing about this, for HPV to be so prevalent, it must have been around for a very long time and apparently humanity has survived until now. However, a couple of years ago, the media whipped the country into a frenzy about HPV and started aggressively pushing the vaccine Gardasil. In early 2008, Governor Rick Perry of Texas issued an executive order requiring that all girls between the ages of eleven
and twelve be vaccinated for HPV before entering sixth grade. This new requirement was to take effect beginning the school year of September 2008.

The implications of this are disturbing. If HPV is supposed to be an STD, why would it be required for pre-teens? Has this society become so depraved that girls are now expected to become sexually active before they even reach puberty?

One freelance writer from Texas wrote, “Statistics show that in 2006, there were over 1,000 new cases and 400 deaths from cervical cancer in Texas alone. It is estimated that over 80% of young women in the country already have HPV so a vaccination may save hundreds of thousands of lives.”

After a public outcry by the people of Texas, many by parents who said that the decision interferes with parenting and will encourage girls to have sex early, the order was overturned by Congress. Following the repeal, the Governor made the statement, “In the next year, more than a thousand women will likely be diagnosed with this insidious yet mostly preventable disease, I challenge legislators to look these women in the eyes and tell them, ‘We could have prevented this disease for your daughters and granddaughters, but we just didn’t have the gumption to address all the misguided and misleading political rhetoric.’ ”
These statements, which are blatantly misleading, are pushed by the media and politicians, banking on people being too lazy to do the research for themselves. Although the law was repealed in Texas, innoculations are now required for 11-26 year old female immigrants applying for a green card.

“The FDA adverse event reports on the HPV vaccine read like a catalog of horrors,” stated Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “Any state or local government now beset by Merck’s lobbying campaigns to mandate this HPV vaccine (Gardasil) for young girls ought to take a look at these adverse health reports. It looks as if an unproven vaccine with dangerous side effects is being pushed as a miracle drug.”

“The FDA adverse event reports on the HPV vaccine read like a catalog of horrors,” stated Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “Any state or local government now beset by Merck’s lobbying campaigns to mandate this HPV vaccine (Gardasil) for young girls ought to take a look at these adverse health reports. It looks as if an unproven vaccine with dangerous side effects is being pushed as a miracle drug.”

I cannot honestly say that I know the reason, but I’ll offer this information: According to Dr. Joseph Mercola (mercola.com) “The federal government’s Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System (VAERS) has received over 9,000 reports of problems since the vaccine’s introduction in 2006 (It has been estimated that only 10% or less of vaccine reactions are reported), which include at least 28 spontaneous abortions, and 27 deaths.” Additionally, he reports that there are concerns raised about the potential for HPV vaccines to cause infertility – whether purposely or not – being heard with more and more often. Gardasil contains Polysorbate-80 which has been linked to infertility in mice.

Additional adverse reactions to Gardasil included 3 deaths, paralysis, Bells Palsy, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, and seizures. It’s enough to say that, for the very limited benefit that Gardasil provides, the risks are much too high.

Without getting too deep into conspiracies, I will just say that we should always be careful when it looks like the government and media are trying to scare us. Usually it means that they have a plan for us that they want us to accept without thinking or questioning.

If there is still concern about cervical cancer, consider this: Although it’s illegal to claim to have a cure for something, traditional healers have been known to prescribe herbs to people with cancer. After the people with cancer have taken the herbs as prescribed, they have reported that they no longer have cancer. So there’s nothing to be scared of if we are intelligent and knowledgeable. Take care of yourself until next time…