Contents

Feature Story

Holy Days or Holidays

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There are many stories about the origins of Thanksgiving, but do any of them honor our origins?

Since the beginning of human civilization, holidays or days of observance have been cherished as special occasions amongst families and larger communities. The original holidays of humanity are extremely important, and they started as holy days observing very specific spiritual and/or astronomic events. Presently, the “holiday season” still brings joy and comfort to all in colonial territories.

For years the origins of the colonial holidays have been exposed by honest researchers. Those origins reveal a very terrifying history of colonial barbarism, genocide and deceit. This deceit not only keeps many ignorant of the true origins of today’s celebrated holidays but also seems to trap even the families who become aware of them in continuing on in “the spirit of the holidays.”

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Kem Graduation

A Tree and Its Roots

“A tree cannot stand without its roots.”

This proverbial wisdom is absolutely true, no matter what kind of tree we are talking about. And so with the world of humans, a family can be considered as a tree. The visible part of the tree is what we tend to notice. This can be considered to be the living relatives. The the roots of the tree are hidden. These can be considered to be the dead relatives or Ancestors of the family tree. A family is strong when it functions together. There must be communication between each part. Considering the wisdom of the proverb, if a family ignores the roots of its family tree, that tree is doomed to fall.

A family stands on the accomplishments of its Ancestors. The living must learn from the successes and failures of those who came before. Any heritage or inheritance of the family must be to the credit of those who have passed on before. Without a common heritage, there is nothing to bring a group of relatives together to even call them a family. What will unite them? What will they do together? How will they know how to treat each other? What goal will they collectively have to achieve something for their descendants?

In recent times, this larger perspective of a family has been degraded. So it is in Meritah (Africa), many families and entire tribes have abandoned the heritage of their Ancestors. As a result, the ancient African civilizations have been greatly weakened and once mighty families have fallen to become firewood or lumber for European, American, Asian and Arab interests. It is in this desperate context that The Earth Center of Meritah was established.

The Earth Center was established by Master Naba Lamoussa Morodenibig, a high priest and master healer from Western Meritah. He provided a link for people all over the world to connect with Kemetic (Traditional African) Culture. He realized that this link would also be needed in Africa itself, as the Kemetic traditions are becoming inaccessible even to many descendants of Kemet on the continent. Foreign religions and political ideologies have created a hostile environment for anyone promoting Kemetic Culture, leaving the children of Kemet disconnected from their roots.

Thenuziri Grad Gen 1Two such children were fortunate enough to discover The Earth Center and enroll in the M’TAM School of Kemetic Philosophy and Spirituality. This is the original education system of Kemet and the heritage of all of its descendants, meaning all humanity. Kemetic education takes the form of initiation. It is not simply a classroom experience. Initiation shapes every aspect of the initiate’s life, how he sees himself and his surroundings, his goals, his do’s and don’ts etc. Initiation brings the   initiate into the way of life of his Ancestors, in other words, his roots.

The M’TAM initiation provides a comprehensive cultural foundation for the human being. The cornerstone of Kemetic initiation is the Kemetic language, Ré N Kemet or Medu Myeet. Language is at the foundation of human culture. Without language, there is no way for a group of people to communicate even a single idea. The language carries the ideas and principles of the culture. For an idea to exist in a human mind, there will have to be a word for it. Without a word for it, how will we make sense of it and communicate it to others. Medu is a highly refined language that has words for many concepts that don’t exist in English, including words to describe the spiritual (non-physical) existence. This is why the Medu Myeet class is the cornerstone of the initiation.

Thenuziri Kaqemna headshotKa’at Ibi is of the second M’TAM class. Ka’at Ibi loosely translates to meditation. Students in this class will learn the exercises and techniques to strengthen and harmonize the mind, body and spirit. Ka’at Ibi is the predecessor to all forms of meditation known to today, such as Yoga and Qigong. Fundamentals of spirituality are also taught as the initiate is forced to reconsider everything about himself and who he thinks he is. The origin and goal of a human life is explained in a way that puts the mind at ease by clearing up the confusion brought by the modern religions and ideologies.

The Sounnt (healing) class teaches the inner workings of the human body. The basic philosophies of healing set the foundation for how we understand the goal of healing and how to achieve it. Initiates also learn how to diagnose disease and identify causes of disease. Healing apprenticeships are also available for Sounnt graduates who can eventually take on healing as a profession.

The new graduates have succeeded in completing the long and difficult journey of their first level of initiation. Upon graduation, they received names that were chosen by reading their Earth Energies. Therefore, these are the names that the Earth itself has given. The graduates each received an individual name to express their personal destiny. Ogunleye Idriss Oyewumi will now be known as Ouzerba, meaning strong soul. Naba Lamoussa Kader will now be known as Kaqemna, meaning seeker’s soul.

Thenuziri Ouzerba headshotAs a group, these two are now bonded as brothers by the same family name. That name is Thenuziri, meaning “Tree of the God WSR or UZIRI”. WSR, as the Ancestral God of humanity, was the one to bring humanity the civilization that separates us from animals. According to the Kemetic Holy Drama, WSR was killed and his coffin ended up next to a tree. That tree grew rapidly to at least 5 times its normal height. This can also be seen as a metaphor to show how much an individual will grow if he keeps the principles and energy of WSR within himself. May they both be strengthened and inspired by this name to grow as that tall tree, fed by humanity’s deepest roots; to grow beyond the normal human limitations, keeping the principles of their Ancestors and Ancestral Gods.

Feature Story

Compost Nature’s Fertilizer

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Woman turns the soil of a compost pile

DEEP WITHIN THE heart of every compost heap, a transformation from life to death to rebirth is taking place. Life is leaving the living plants of yesterday, but in their death these leaves, stalks and grass clippings are passing on their vitality to the coming generations of future seasons. Here in a dank and moldy pile, the wheel of life is turning.

Compost is more than a fertilizer or a healing agent for the soil’s wounds. It is a symbol of continuing life. Nature herself made compost before man first walked the Earth. Leaves, twigs, branches and fruit falling to the forest floor and slowly decomposing is composting. The birds, the insects and the animals all contribute their bodies to the vast and continuous soil rebuilding program of nature.

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Feature Story

Starting Your Garden

garden-design-layout-ideas-webA small garden can yield big dividends. With a little planning you can have a satisfying garden in a space smaller than many living rooms. Here are a few ideas for a”basic vegetable garden.”

First, you’ll want to draw your own garden plan, varying it to fit the space available and the kind of vegetables your family prefers. In planning your vegetable garden, keep in mind that some vegetables like cool weather and should be seeded as soon as the danger of frost is past. Beets, carrots, chives, onions, lettuce, peas, radishes, parsley, turnips and rutabagas are in this category. On the other hand, beans, cucumbers, melons and squash like warm weather and should be planted later on, after the soil is warmed up and the weather is pleasantly mild (late spring or early summer).

Peppers, eggplant and tomatoes are usually started indoors (6 to 8 weeks before outdoor gardening season) then transplanted to the garden when the soil and weather conditions permit.

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Kem Life

A Giving That Transcends

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A guest receives free food and clothing at the Chicago Earth Center

In the eyes of the Earth Center’s founder, Neb Naba Lamoussa Morodenibig, service to the community is of utmost importance. Along with his primary mission – aimed to provide a bridge in which colonized people can access the traditional, initiatic knowledge of our Kemetic Ancestors – he particularly expressed a desire to see the organization spearheading charitable work, including food and clothing drives on a regular basis. Neb Naba often emphasized the importance of humility and the positive effect that it has on one’s quality as a human being. He stressed the concept of service within a communal environment; an interdependency among members of the community was the Ancestral way that sustained human life and civilization for over 150,00 years.

As humble servants of humanity, on 29 Tepia 415 (February 6th , 2016), the Earth Center continued this mission – running a food and clothing drive from the Chicago Earth Center storefront location with our partner for this event, Betty Shabazz Academy International Charter Schools, serving as a drop-off location on Chicago’s south side. Through this partnership and the hard work of initiates, the Chicago Earth Center was able to provide clothing, non-perishable foods, hot soup and bread to families in need this winter season.

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